Why Flies Are So Annoyingly Persistent

Why Flies Are So Annoyingly Persistent

When it comes to annoying creatures, you can’t beat flies. These little creepers are all over the place, buzzing around your head in the shower, in your lunchbox, and your bedroom. They are the only things that will disturb your sleep all the time. They are also the only animals that will ruin perfectly good food for nothing, just because they want to. Don’t you just hate it when that happens?

There are a lot of reasons why flies are so annoyingly persistent. For one, they are the most common (and typically, the most disgusting) of all insects. And they’ve got it all, from the annoying to the disgusting, to the downright annoying. They are able to fly, reproduce, and annoy people.

Ever see a fly buzzing around your kitchen and think to yourself, “How can such a small creature be so annoying”? You might be surprised to learn that flies aren’t the size of a peanut—the average adult fly is approximately the size of a period at the end of this sentence, which is about the same as a red blood cell. Still, flies are as annoying as they are small and have been found to be incredibly persistent.

Flies are irritating pests that plague both urban areas and wild, open areas, and they are notoriously able to adapt to nearly any environment they are found in. Some flies, like fruit flies, are harmless and can be easily disposed of by simply washing the fruit and throwing it away. However, many of our other common fly species, like the housefly, are not so easily disposed of.

Flies are annoying creatures. They can give you a painful bite, and they can also give you food poisoning. For some reason, they can’t fly the way most other flies do. Instead, they blunder around, bumping into things and flying into your face. Why are they so annoying? Well, it turns out that flies have evolved to make us annoyed.

Flies are pesky, but we’ve all been frustrated at least once by the pesky flies that seem to appear at the worst possible times—and they don’t seem to care. Why are flies so persistent? “They have to be,” says Daniel Robert, a behavioral ecologist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). “They are not just constantly running around looking for a mate.”

The most prevalent flying insect in our area is the common housefly, and it’s a pest that we can’t seem to get rid of. The reason is simple: it’s not a particularly intelligent insect, and it lives on a simple diet of human food. From pies to sugar to salt, there’s enough food for flocks of houseflies to thrive in our area.

There are many reasons why flies are so annoying, but the main reason is that mosquitoes have a much greater vision range and can fly further and faster, while flies are blind and therefore can’t see them coming. So, flies are trying to escape but can’t see their way out. The other reason flies are annoying is that their waste products—mostly uric acid—stain the water. So, flies are annoying, uric acid is annoying, and mosquitoes and flies are annoying, which is why the world is full of flies.

Flies, like most other animals, have an instinct to avoid humans. They are quick to learn to avoid humans and not only that, but they’ll even take to the air when we’re not looking. Flies are persistent creatures, and we have to be too.

If you’ve ever tried to swat a fly, you know how annoying they can be. Flies are so ubiquitous that they’re a nuisance, and even if you don’t find them that annoying, you’re probably still grossed out by the thought of dealing with them. Here’s the thing, though: they’re here to stay. We still have millions of species that make up the order Diptera, and we know that they’re in endless supply. Why? Well, flies digest their food with enzymes inside their heads and aren’t even fast enough to out-pace you if you try to chase them down. That means that we can’t really stop them from coming to our house.

 

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